35 Idioms for class

35 idioms 4 class

While catching up on some films and shows, I noticed a few school idioms and decided to do something different this week. So here is a list of some common classroom-based idioms that you may hear, read or hopefully, even use.


A for effort

This comes from the A – F grading system meaning that at least you tried.

The presentation was terrible but you get an A for effort.

A schoolboy error

Meaning that this was a very basic mistake down at an early stage of learning.

The President mispronouncing “nuclear” was a schoolboy error.

Apple polisher

This is popular in Brazil with students although I’ve never heard it in my lifetime in the states. It comes from the old custom of bringing an apple to your teacher to win their favor and polishing it to make it shine the brightest.

I heard you compliment the teacher on her new dress. You are such an apple polisher.

 As easy as ABC

Michael Jackson made it famous with his brothers singing about a simple process.

Learning the steps to speaking is as easy as ABC.

 Back to basics

Means, as it sounds, going back to the beginning stages of learning and starting there.

The student, having trouble with advanced grammar, had to go back to the basics.

 Be a bookworm

This is someone who loves to read and spends all their time in a book. Named after any insect or worm that bores through the pages and binding of a book.

Stephen is such a bookworm. He can always be found reading.

 Cheat sheet

This, historically, was like a crib sheet (see below) used for cheating on exams. In higher grades, “Cheat sheets” or “cheatsheets” are being used legally whereas a student is allowed to prepare their own notes for the exam to use as a reference.

The student was caught using a cheat sheet and given a zero on the exam.

 Cover a lot of ground

To go in depth or to visit many subjects in class. This is a figurative phrase for a vast area.

We went over so many different topics today. The teacher covered a lot of ground.

 Crack a book

To “crack open” is a phrasal verb for “to open”. To crack a book is to open a book to study used both in the positive and negative forms.

I took the exam without cracking a book. I would have done better if I had cracked a book.

 Cramming for a test

Waiting until the last minute and trying to “stuff” your brain with all the information at once.

He didn’t study all year so he found himself cramming the last week of the semester.

 Crank out a paper

To write or produce a paper, story or project. This goes back to the days when you had to turn the crank to print something on a press.

I’ll be ready to post my weekly blog as soon as I crank out this paper.

 Crib notes (Crib sheet)

These are notes that are put on small pieces of paper or other hidden areas used for cheating during exams. Formulas, dates, lists and definitions to help one pass a test.

The student was expelled from school when the teacher found her crib notes inside her pen.

 Ditch class (cut class, skip class)

To not go to one’s class without permission. To cut it out of one’s schedule.

The students cut class and went to the beach instead.

 Flunk out

To not pass a course due to poor grades. To fail the class.

Most people, who don’t study, flunk out of advanced level courses.

 Go to the head of the class

This occurs when someone does something outstanding. Similar to “go to the front of the line” or you are at the “top of your class”.

After an amazing explanation, the student went to the head of the class.

 Have it down to a science

To be able to do something well and handle all the details. Well practiced.

We have so much experience teaching grammar to students we have it down to a science.

 Learn by heart

To study and practice until it is understood and firmly placed in one’s memory. Internalized.

The presenter didn’t use notes as he learned the presentation by heart.

 Learn by rote

To repeat over and over as a method of memorizing words, phrases or texts, probably without understanding. Using repetition drills as a technique for memory.

Learning by rote taught him to remember the words but not the significance of the speech.

 Learn the hard way

This is when you learn through experience and usually, not in a pleasant manner.

He learned the hard way that downloading music can have consequences.

 Learn your lesson

Similar to learning the hard way. You learn through an unpleasant experience. This differs from the idiom to “teach a lesson” which is to get even with someone for something they did to you.

I hope you learned your lesson and won’t copy illegal music again.

 Make the grade

To successfully reach the expected requirements where the grade is the general standard.

His hard work paid off allowing him to make the grade for the first time this year.

 Play hooky

To not go to class or school or some other event. To be truant. Also hookey.

The entire senior class played hooky today and were found at the local beach instead of school.

 Pull an all-nighter

This is to stay up all night long in order to study for a test the next day. Usually this is last minute and not planned.

He was so tired from pulling an all-nighter that he fell asleep during the test.

 Put on your thinking cap

This, metaphorically, means to sit and take a moment to really think about the problem or situation before coming up with an answer.

The teacher told us the solution wasn’t obvious and we should put on our thinking caps before answering.

 School of hard knocks

A method of learning through experience from work or life and not from a textbook. It refers to getting knocked around in life while learning.

The school dropout was forced to learn business from the school of hard knocks.

School of thought

This is the generally accepted standard or concept of a topic. It is how and what most people feel or think.

The new school of thought is that learning online can be just as effective as in the classroom.

 Show of hands

This is an old-fashioned method of polling; asking a question and counting the responses of the polled by raising their hands.

By a show of hands, how many of you knew what this meant?

 Teach an old dog new tricks

This is the ability to teach and older person, or one who has knowledge or experience a new way of doing something or thinking about something.

Successfully teaching adults a new language show that you can teach an old dog new tricks.

 Tell tales out of school

This expression is about gossip. It means that you are talking behind one’s back to reveal their secrets. The origins seem to suggest this first meant telling the teacher something bad about another student after class.

I stopped being friends with her when I discovered that she betrayed my trust by telling tales out of school.

 The dunce cap

This conical hat was once worn in schools by students who either didn’t study or misbehaved. The concept of being a dunce means to be dumb or a fool. Punishment included wearing the hat and sitting in the corner for an hour or more during class.

As the student knew nothing the teacher had just taught, she sat him in the corner wearing the dunce hat.

 The three r’s

The three r’s refer to the basic skill foundations of education: reading, writing and arithmetic. The use of the strong R sound in each word lead to this British expression.

We send our kids to school to learn the three r’s so they can get the basic skills needed.

 You’ve been schooled

Well then, to wrap up, we turn to rap. To be schooled is to be educated. Hip hop helped to make it a negative phrase by meaning you were taken to school and shown how it is done.

We beat their team 50 to 10. They’ve been schooled.

Now, you’ve been schooled!


000

Rob Howard is the owner of Online Language Center. He is a teacher, tutor, trainer, material designer and author for English as a foreign language. He is also a consultant and has been a frequent speaker internationally regarding online retention as well as using technology in and out of the classroom. Originally from Boston, Massachusetts in the U.S., he is currently residing in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. You may e-mail him at rob@onlinelanguagecenter.com.

blog o month

Advertisements

our blog is here to share our ideas, thoughts and suggestions with both teachers and learners about language learning. we are an elite group of education professionals from around the world sharing our knowledge with others from around the world.

Tagged with: , , , , , ,
Posted in e-learning, english, language, vocabulary
6 comments on “35 Idioms for class
  1. very useful for both young boys and elderly persons

    Like

  2. annforeman says:

    Hi Rob,

    Just to let you know that we’ve shortlisted this blog post for this month’s TeachingEnglish blog award and I’ll be putting up a post about it on today’s TeachingEnglish Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/TeachingEnglish.BritishCouncil, if you’d like to check there for likes and comments.

    Best,
    Ann

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Hi Rob!! I’ve always been a bit of a bookworm. 🙂 Thanks for sharing these school idioms. I’m gonna make sure to follow you on Twitter! -Sabrina, Fellow Online English Teacher

    Like

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

recent posts: online language center blog

SAILING THE SEA OF CTRL C + V by Rob Howard

SAILING THE SEA OF CTRL C + V     by Rob Howard

By now, I’m sure we’ve all seen the Melania Trump speech that plagiarized Michelle Obama. Finally, teachers the world over have the perfect example to demonstrate blatant plagiarism to their students.

EFLtalks answers – 10 in 10 for YOU

EFLtalks answers – 10 in 10 for YOU

Got questions? We’ve got answers. 10 in 10 for YOU

Flipping Feedback: Screencasting Feedback on Student Essays by Ron Martinez

Flipping Feedback: Screencasting Feedback on Student Essays by Ron Martinez

Looking for a new way to mentor students of academic writing, Ron Martinez came up with a great one. This should be the new standard.

Recipes for the Unteachable by David Petrie

Recipes for the Unteachable by David Petrie

Are there controversial topics that you want to teach, but you do not know how? Do you think your students might not be ready for them? David Petrie has the perfect recipe for these issues. You can read some ideas in his blog post and also for more tips, do not miss his webinar for BELTA on January 10th, at 16.00 CET!

Introducing our free new ebook – Parsnips in ELT: Stepping out of the comfort zone (Vol. 2)

Introducing our free new ebook – Parsnips in ELT: Stepping out of the comfort zone (Vol. 2)

Introducing our free new ebook – Parsnips in ELT: Stepping out of the comfort zone (Vol. 2)

LOOK WHO’S EFLTALKING by Rob Howard

LOOK WHO’S EFLTALKING by Rob Howard

This article originally appeared in the BRAZ-TESOL newsletter, volume 04.2015.

The Good, The Bad, And The Online by Rob Howard

The Good, The Bad, And The Online by Rob Howard

How do you deal with people who want your services for free? Take a look at this.

Should I mind my own Beeswax? by Rob Howard

Should I mind my own Beeswax? by Rob Howard

Reposted from EFL Magazine, my article about whether or not we should be spending time teaching outdated idioms with some many others that we miss.

EFLtalks – talks for teachers
Follow online language center blog on WordPress.com

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 2,082 other followers

Blog Stats
  • 82,395 hits
%d bloggers like this: